The side-veneer graft is a type of side graft and it is widely used to graft conifers. It is a common graft that uses small potted seedlings as the rootstock.

Side-veneer grafts are used to produce various types of upright juniper, and dwarf conifers like specialty pines (Pinus) and spruce (Picea).

Photo showing an example of a side-veneer graft.

Two illustrations showing rootstock and scion preparation. Rootstock in prepared by a long shallow cut being made into one side of a stem. A short second downward cut is made at the base of the first, removing a piece of the bark and wood. The scion is prepared by a long shallow cut being made into one side of the stem. A second short cut on the opposite side is then made.

Illustration showing three steps for completing a side-veneer graft. The scion is inserted into the cut in the rootstock and made flush with it. The two parts are then tied togetehr. Afterward the rootstock is gradually cut back.

The lower needles on scions must be removed by pulling or scraping with a knife.

Photo of technicians removing lower needles from scions.

Photo of a flat of prepared scions.

Photo of completed graft covered with a grafting compound.

Completed graft covered with a grafting compound to prevent the graft union from drying.

Photo showing a graft with the scion and rootstock shoots identified.

Healed blue spruce graft (arrow 1) ready to have the green rootstock (arrow 2) cut back.

Finished grafts with the rootstock's top completely removed.

Photo of an example of a finished graft with the rootstock's top completely removed.

Photo of an example of a finished graft with the rootstock's top completely removed.

A common practice for small potted side-veneer grafts is to plunge the grafted plants into a slightly moist medium, such as peat moss, so that it just covers the graft union. This prevents the graft from drying until it is healed.

Photo showing a technician placing small potted side-veneer grafts into peat moss medium.

Close up photo of small potted side-veneer grafts placed into peat moss medium.

Grafts may be covered with polyethylene and shade to keep graft union from drying. The shade helps reduce heat build up under the plastic.

Photo of grafts covered with polyethylene under shade.

Photo showing grafts under polyethylene that has been partially removed to show plants underneath.